Financing an undersea station

financing an undersea station

(Updated 15.12.2019; added new aspects for daily turnover) The most professional underwater habitat so far is still the Aquarius habitat in Florida. This quality comes to a certain price of $1.2 to $3 million per year. Due to budget cuts, NOAA ceased funding Aquarius habitat after September 2012, with no further missions scheduled after a July 2012 mission. It was a very exciting period having the facility on risk. It took until January 2013 when a proposal to keep Aquarius running under Florida International University administration was accepted. What could we do in future projects to avoid sooner or later close-downs by lacks of financing? Continue reading “Financing an undersea station”

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Habitat Entrance

The moonpool of habitat Hydrolab
Moonpool of Hydrolab

(Updated 06.07.2019; added access space details, feature list and first sketch) Surely one of the most complicated area of an underwater structure for human occupation is the habitat entrance. It is the local water-air interface, vulnerable to changes in pressure by tidal movements on the surface of the sea; its hatches have to bare potential pressure differences between the habitat interior and the surrounding water; no object that is only a little bigger than the greatest diameter of the entrance can be brought into the habitat. It is constantly wet and humid and the only gateway for medical assistance. But to see in detail let’s have a look at the different sections of the entrance complex. Continue reading “Habitat Entrance”

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General Requirements of Human Beings

To build an underwater habitat we have to know the measurements of human abilities, his limiting values and restrictions. In 2010 NASA published the Human Integration Design Handbook which gives answers to most of these questions. Though it is meant for space flight we can easily adapt most of it to an underwater application. The handbook is available as *.pdf on the server of our digital library. Contact Mart for access.

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Branch & Bound

(Guest article by user Mike, thanks for contributing) By common definition, Branch & Bound is a mathematical algorithm to solve integer optimization problems. But simplified versions of Branch & Bound are also applied to find best fitting technical solutions manually. It is a useful tool for making fundamental decisions, such as the selection of a synthesis route during the project development of a new chemical factory complex.

In the context of CalamarPark, the design of the underwater habitat is such a fundamental decision: Should it be small or large? To operate at what depth? Ambient or atmospheric pressure? A certain design might be perfect at one location, but only second choice at another. Continue reading “Branch & Bound”

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Worst Case Scenarios: Introduction

worst case(Update 22.06.2018: Expanded list of proposed scenarios) In this category we would like to list potential “Worst Case Scenarios”, their prevention and handling. The results of each scenario naturally link to two different applications:

 

  • structural measures of the habitat (to be considered during planning and construction of the habitat)
  • emergency procedures (to be considered before accommodation)

Continue reading “Worst Case Scenarios: Introduction”

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BIOSMHARS

Bacteria isolated in dairy product (representative image)BIOSMHARS was a 2-year (2011-2013) research project co-funded by the European Commission under FP7. It was the first phase of a joint EU-Russia research effort to develop the scientific and technical tools for a comprehensive approach to the challenging issue of biocontamination inside manned spacecrafts. (project page; final report as pdf)

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Undersea Station Draft No.4: Hangar

Undersea Station Draft No.4; Module 1; overview
Module 1; overview (preliminary rendering; V26-04-2018)

Update 27.04.2018: added new renderings) So far the final draft follows the hangar shape. Having a look at the evaluation list in the ‘Structural Shape‘ chapter it seems like the ideal shape for the undersea station.

Because of the sand used as variable ballast and the space under the station the structure is easily removable by just releasing the sand. No harmful materials or items would be left behind which serves the ecological idea. Continue reading “Undersea Station Draft No.4: Hangar”

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