Undersea Station Draft No.4: Hangar

© CalamarPark.comSo far the final draft follows the hangar shape. Having a look at the evaluation list in the ‘Structural Shape‘ chapter it seems like the ideal shape for the undersea station.

Because of the sand used as variable ballast and the space under the station the structure is easily removable by just releasing the sand. No harmful materials or items would be left behind which serves the ecological idea. Continue reading “Undersea Station Draft No.4: Hangar”

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Undersea Station: Event Plan

IWM Theme Park AnchorOne of the differences to other previous stations is the fact that it is not only available for a small group of scientists, but to a large group even of private participants. Of course, it still requires a very strict program to enter the station. The idea is to settle the station inside a park (The Calamar-Park) and make it available for all sport divers. For this touristic purpose a row of activities and attractions has to be designed. These attractions will follow a chronological program to maintain continuous popularity. That means that when an attraction reaches its half-time period another attraction should be already on its way as seen in the following graph: Continue reading “Undersea Station: Event Plan”

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Undersea Station Draft No. 3: Sphere

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Source: WikimediaFor a long time we favoured the shape of a sphere mainly because there were ready structures available used as pressure resistant LPG tanks. It would have measured 12m in diameter, the lower half would be filled with sand just before lowering while the upper half would contain two floors of living space. After discussing the idea with different engineers we had to accept that a LPG tank would need so many modifications that building a new one would be even cheaper. After receiving the first cost estimations we were pretty sure that it would be impossible to find funding for a civil structure of that scale.

Continue reading “Undersea Station Draft No. 3: Sphere”

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Undersea Station: Ballast

ballast-experimentKeeping an air filled structure on the sea-floor is more difficult than expected. Especially while descending and landing the station major difficulties occurred on previous stations. We can calculate about one kilo of weight (negative buoyancy) per litre of air inside the station (positive buoyancy). The dimensions are huge: imagine a space of 50 m² with a height of 2m, which equals 100 tons of counterweight. At the same time it has to be considered, that these weights have to be lifted again in the end of the mission. For ecological reasons we should find a way to leave the weights on the site and to use a material that would not harm the environment. Continue reading “Undersea Station: Ballast”

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Sounds from the deep

NOAA logoSeven miles deep, the ocean is still a noisy place. NOAA and partners bring back first recordings from deepest part of the world’s ocean. For what may be the first time, NOAA and partner scientists eavesdropped on the deepest part of the world’s ocean and instead of finding a sea of silence, discovered a cacophony of sounds both natural and caused by humans. More on NOAA.gov

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