Kemer Underwater Guide

UW Guide KemerIn 2007 we completed the interactive underwater guide for Kemer/Turkey including the regions Antalya City, Beldibi, Göynük, Kemer, Kiriş, Çamyuva, Tekirova (incl. the Environmental Park ‘3 Islands’) and Adrasan. The project was sponsored by ANEX Tour and Club Magic Life and used on various fairs as a promotion tool for the scuba diving tourism. By being programmed in HTML the guide was compatible with all computer systems. Continue reading “Kemer Underwater Guide”

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Diving Bell ‘Medusa’

© CalamarPark.comTogether with the popular MARES Diving Center of IWM of Dieter Heinz in Antalya/Turkey we decided in 2006 to construct a simple diving bell for touristic purposes in a depth of appr. 9m. This diving bell would serve as an advertisement carrier, sales tool and later as a decompression stop bell if successfully positioned. It should last for at least two years being removed during six winter months. As a design we wanted the construction to follow the shape of a jelly fish and to look a bit futuristic. After agreeing and drawing the final design we calculated costs of 1000 € which included the umbrella, the skeleton, the counterweights and the working force. Continue reading “Diving Bell ‘Medusa’”

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Nemo’s Garden Project by OCEAN REEF

Portulaca_sativa_01 © Wikimedia Commons, User: BurschikGrowing plants in the undersea station will be very difficult. But the experiment below brought the following question to my mind: If the site of the station would be the Mediterranean, which is a subtropical environment, then the main season would be the summertime. During that period many crops would not grow due to sunlight intensity and heat. The project in the video might be an alternative to use the seawater as a light filter and cooling medium. Would it be worth to investigate?

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CO2 Scrubber

Amron International, CO2 ScrubberLonger stays in an underwater station require systems to filter out Carbon Dioxide (CO2) from the air that is exhaled by the aquanauts. These CO2 scrubbers generally consist of a fan that pulls air through a canister filled with Carbon Dioxide (CO2) adsorbent, such as Sodasorb or Sodalime. To get a rough idea about CO2 scrubbers and their prices visit the webpage of AMRON International.

 

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Undersea Station Draft No.4: Hangar

© CalamarPark.comSo far the final draft follows the hangar shape. Having a look at the evaluation list in the ‘Structural Shape‘ chapter it seems like the ideal shape for the undersea station.

Because of the sand used as variable ballast and the space under the station the structure is easily removable by just releasing the sand. No harmful materials or items would be left behind which serves the ecological idea. Continue reading “Undersea Station Draft No.4: Hangar”

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Undersea Station: Operational Depth

© CalamarPark.comThe operational depth of the station correlates with the targeted type of users and the desired decompression schedule. Let’s start from the extreme:

50m and more (depth of Sealab III -189m, depth of Conshelf III -100m): This depth is highly complicated. The aquanauts are saturated and demand long decompression periods of several days after the dives. Therefore it is impossible to go and come back, but one dive (exposure) should last several days. The breathing mixture consists mostly of Helium which makes communication without unscramblers impossible. The handling of pure oxygen requires oxygen-clear equipment. The aquanauts have to pass a long training program. The environment is cold and dark. Depths like this might be a target for the future, but for the beginning and especially for the purpose to attract attention it is not first choice. All these obstacles occur at all depths of more than 60m. Continue reading “Undersea Station: Operational Depth”

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Undersea Station: Event Plan

IWM Theme Park AnchorOne of the differences to other previous stations is the fact that it is not only available for a small group of scientists, but to a large group even of private participants. Of course, it still requires a very strict program to enter the station. The idea is to settle the station inside a park (The Calamar-Park) and make it available for all sport divers. For this touristic purpose a row of activities and attractions has to be designed. These attractions will follow a chronological program to maintain continuous popularity. That means that when an attraction reaches its half-time period another attraction should be already on its way as seen in the following graph: Continue reading “Undersea Station: Event Plan”

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Undersea Station Draft No. 3: Sphere

Sphere DraftUpdated 13.05.2017; For a long time we favoured the shape of a sphere mainly because there were ready structures available used as pressure resistant LPG tanks. It would have measured 12m in diameter, the lower half would be filled with sand just before lowering while the upper half would contain two floors of living space. After discussing the idea with different engineers we had to accept that a LPG tank would need so many modifications that building a new one would be even cheaper. After receiving the first cost estimations we were pretty sure that it would be impossible to find funding for a civil structure of that scale.

Continue reading “Undersea Station Draft No. 3: Sphere”

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Undersea Station: Ballast

ballast-experimentKeeping an air filled structure on the sea-floor is more difficult than expected. Especially while descending and landing the station major difficulties occurred on previous stations. We can calculate about one kilo of weight (negative buoyancy) per litre of air inside the station (positive buoyancy). The dimensions are huge: imagine a space of 50 m² with a height of 2m, which equals 100 tons of counterweight. At the same time it has to be considered, that these weights have to be lifted again in the end of the mission. For ecological reasons we should find a way to leave the weights on the site and to use a material that would not harm the environment. Continue reading “Undersea Station: Ballast”

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Undersea Station: Structural Shape

Epipelagial m1 logoUpdate 22.04.2016: So far 42 contributions generating 20375 visits. Thanks to all previous and coming participants. Feel free to join the development by using the comment function below.

Until now four different drafts were considered. Each shape developed after discussing pros and cons of the previous one. During this process we were able to define and approach constantly the following targets: Continue reading “Undersea Station: Structural Shape”

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Sounds from the deep

NOAA logoSeven miles deep, the ocean is still a noisy place. NOAA and partners bring back first recordings from deepest part of the world’s ocean. For what may be the first time, NOAA and partner scientists eavesdropped on the deepest part of the world’s ocean and instead of finding a sea of silence, discovered a cacophony of sounds both natural and caused by humans. More on NOAA.gov

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Undersea Station: Portholes

Update 19.03.2016: So far 8 contributions generating 4839 visits. Thanks to all previous and coming participants. Feel free to join the development.

window_thumIn terms of marketing the portholes provide probably the most important component of the system. They are fundamental reason for potential visitors to reserve a short or long stay in the system, tool for observing the outside world (during stays for educational purposes) and attraction to a look from the outside into the inside (tourism marketing).
At the same time they are one of the weak points of the system and small irregularities between the seals could lead to the collapse of the structure. Therefore, the thickness of the glass should be designed according to highest possible load.
Continue reading “Undersea Station: Portholes”

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The Virtual Sky of Fraunhofer Institute

© Fraunhofer GesellschaftIn 2012 Fraunhofer Institute succeeded to build an electronic ceiling imitating a window to the sky. This might be a good technology for long stays at the Undersea Station.

Translation of the Fact Sheet: ‘Virtual Sky is a dynamic, multi-spectral light ceiling. The prototype in the laboratory of the Fraunhofer IAO covers an area of ​​34 m² and integrated a total of 34,560 LED with four different colours. Like this more than 16 million colours can be represented. They are grouped in a total of 240 (20×12) individually controllable squares (30 x 30 cm) that can be directed just like display pixels. Both temporally and spatially dynamic lighting is possible.

Continue reading “The Virtual Sky of Fraunhofer Institute”

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Submarine Interior

Image Source: Von Bellona Foundation? - Bellona Foundation, Copyrighted free use, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5338641If you always wondered how the biggest ever built submarine, the russian Typhoon class  interior looks like you should have a look at livejournal.com. It has designed for a crew of 160 marines and has a length of more than 170m. The images were taken 2009 and show the whole interior including sauna, pool and gym.

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